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SearchThisVideo: Blender 2.9 Beginner Tutorial – Part 1

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Watch video at 00:00
if you are new to blender this tutorial
was designed for you
together we're going to go step by step
as you create your first 3d project
[Music]
[Music]
if you're like me the first time you
opened up a 3d package you might feel
like you've just
entered an alien spaceship there are so
many different buttons
so many different menus so many
different tabs and this can be super
overwhelming when you're first starting
which is why we at cgfastrock.com
are super passionate about really
simplifying the process
and building the courses that we wish we
had when we first started this is the
blender fast track series
in part one we're going to get up and
running with the 3d viewport
we're going to take those skills and
level up by building this minecraft
scene
in part two we will learn the basics of
polygon modeling
we're going to model out the sword we're
going to apply textures and shaders
in part 3 we're going to go over
cinematic rendering and environment
building
utilizing the included rocket and as a
bonus we're going to integrate the
character and go over some basic
keyframe camera animation if you would
like to get to know me there'll be a
link in the description
to my demo row and with all that said
let's get going
we're gonna start working on building
out our minecraft scene here
so when you first open up blender you'll
notice that there's a lot of stuff
in the interface there's a million and
one buttons for part one we're primarily
going to focus on the 3d view so we can
ignore most of the stuff
just to get going and the 3d view is
going to be right here in the center
right there so this is where we're going
to be spending
most of our time and inside of this 3d
view you'll see
three strange looking objects right we
have our
cube right here which is going to be our
mesh we have our little circle thing
right here
which is going to be our light and then
we have this little triangle
thing over here which is going to be our
camera we're going to be using each
three of these
very heavily as we move forward the most
important one we want to get to know
is going to be our cube so if you notice
as we move around
and we click on these individual icons
these individual objects

Watch video from 03:00 - 6:00

you notice they get a little yellow
highlight around them so that's how you
know that an
object is selected so why is selecting
objects important
whatever is highlighted is how we tell
blender what we're going to be working
with at this point
and we can start working on these
objects by working with our toolbar over
here
so these three main buttons over here
are the most important buttons that we
want to get to know for part one the top
one right here is going to be move
then we have rotate and we have scale
and you'll notice that whatever we have
selected
is going to now have these little gizmos
on them so i'm going to select my mesh
to start and i'm going to play around
with move so with move you'll notice
that we have three different handles and
if we just click and drag on these
you notice that we can move our object
around very very basic
and if we start going down right here
with rotate
you'll notice that we have three more
handles and if we just click and drag on
any one of these handles
we can now rotate our object very very
basic and the same thing with scale so
when we go to scale
we get three different handles now we
can scale our object
for scale mostly what i use is just this
outer white
circle right here that's how you do
uniform scale that's how you scale the
entire object
up and down now there are some other
tools over here the most important one
outside of these is going to be
selection which is going to be at the
very top
and this is just how we basically select
our objects but with that said we have
our move rotating scale
and you can also just select while those
are inactive as well so for the most
part you'll see me in part one just
using these three right here
and we'll touch up on some other ones as
we go experiment with these get to know
these three very well
and then in the next shop what we'll do
is we'll start talking about navigating
our 3d view
so navigation is how we move around our
scene just like this
and you'll be able to see my hotkeys
with both my keyboard
and my mouse right down here and what
you'll see down here is basically we
have
middle mouse which is going to orbit
around our scene
so you can think of this as orbiting or
rotating
and then we have middle mouse scroll up
and down so we zoom in and out
build a mouse scroll up and down and
then we have
shift middle mouse button which is going
to pan around
so you think of panning as moving middle
mouse scrolling
as zooming in and out and then we have
middle mouse alone just to orbit
now if you ever get lost something like
this you kind of flipped around maybe
upside down
if you just go up to your view menu up
here and then you go to view and then
just go to
frame all it'll basically just reset the
entire scene
so that's just view frame all there's a
lot of other really good stuff in this
view menu that we'll get to in a bit and
if you don't have a three mouse button
what we can do is we can set up our
preferences
so if you're on a laptop we can do is
just go to edit preferences
and then you'll go down to input over
here
and then what we can do is just do
emulate three mouse button
and if you hover over that you notice it
says alt left mouse button
so you'll click that and then all of a
sudden we can now use instead of
middle mouse button we can just hold alt

Watch video from 06:00 - 9:00

and then do left
click to orbit around like that so most
of you guys are not going to actually
need that
i'm going to go ahead and turn that back
off so these three tools right here are
going to take a lot of practice
this entire part 1 and part 2 of blender
fast track
is basically going to be a toolbar and
navigation exercise that's all we're
going to be doing
is practicing how to move things around
and how to get comfortable moving around
our 3d scene right here
you're going to feel like you're
stumbling around you're going to feel
like you're having a difficult time
maybe but just like riding a bicycle you
will get better
over time it takes a lot of practice to
get good at this part
all right and then in the next chapter
what we'll do is we'll start building
out the first pillar to our minecraft
scene
this is our goal right now we want to
start building out the initial pillar to
our scene
and the first thing we're going to learn
how to do is how to duplicate our cube
around
at this point we've been working pretty
messy so we want to reset our scene so
we have two tools whenever we get stuck
in blender
to reset or undo first one is just going
to be edit undo
but if you really get stuck if you
really mess things up or you can just do
a file
new and then general general is just
going to be the default blender file so
if you click that
file new general everything in the scene
is going to reset
you can go ahead and hit don't save
everything is going to reset and you're
going to be presented with the default
blender scene which is where we're going
to start now
so we want to start duplicating our cube
right so
if we right click we have duplicate
objects right here
in the center so duplicate objects is
really a three-step process we
right-click duplicate objects
and then we move it around and then we
click to drop it
right-click duplicate objects move it
around
click to drop it now if we want to get
rid of cubes what we can do is
right-click
and delete all the way at the bottom so
right click delete all the way at the
bottom
and the problem with this is that you
know if we move this around with our
move tool
manually you'll see that okay it's going
to be really really tedious
setting up this minecraft scene having
to manually place all the stuff
right next to each other right so what
we want to do here i'm going to go ahead
and delete that
is use our snapping tool so while our
cube is selected and while our move tool
is selected we want to come up here to
our snap
tool right up here so after you click
your snap tool it's going to highlight
blue blue means it's going to be
active and now if we move things around
you'll see okay now it's going to be
snapping around
it's going to be snapping which is going
to make it a lot easier for us to line
these things up
if i right click here duplicate objects
move this up you notice now we can line
this stuff up
pretty easily at this point now another
tool that we want to do here
to line this up is you know if we move
this around
at an angle like this it's this this
kind of stuff scrap where we right click
duplicate objects and it's going to be
really hard to kind of make this stuff
go where it wants to go
right so what we want to do here i'm
going to go ahead and delete object
what we want to do here is look at this
from a profile view we only want to be
looking at this
from one angle at a time this is three

Watch video from 09:00 - 12:00

different angles
this is two different angles this is one
different angle right
so we want to select that from one
different angle right click
and then duplicate objects and then move
that up and we'll just go ahead and do
that over and over and over
so you can just continue duplicating
this up the amount of cubes i'm going to
leave off with
is just going to be a number of 10 and
then so 10 cubes tall
and now if we want to start scaling
these tops and bottom ones you'll notice
that we
can start scaling at this but the
problem with this is that it's not going
to be incremental
so if i scale this like this and just
edit undo or control z out of that
you'll notice that as we duplicate it's
not going to be lined up
right so that's going to be a problem
right so i'm going to go ahead and
delete that
and then the next chapter we'll start
talking about our properties menu our
properties menu over here which is going
to help us out with that
so goal right now is to set the exact
scale values right here
so that when we duplicate this that
they'll line up perfectly
so to do this we're going to need our
properties menu so our properties you
can think of node properties or object
properties
in blender as basically we have our 3d
objects
we have our mesh our light and our
camera right here
and each one of these objects are going
to have properties
that are within them that we don't that
we don't necessarily have control over
in the 3d view to set up so as i select
these objects right here you'll notice
that right down here
our properties menu is going to change
this is a very very confusing part of
blender
because not only do we have all these
menus up here we have all these menus
over here
and it can be just one big confusing
mess so
the first step to understanding the
properties menu is that these
menus change down here anything that's
up here is going to stay static
right so all everything at the top right
here these settings
all these menus right here they're the
way to modify the actual blender
scene file or the world of blender
whereas these bottom ones down here are
going to be the way to modify
the objects them that live within the
blender file
if you're ever wondering what any of
these tabs do if you just hover your
mouse over them
it'll actually give you the text version
which can be a little bit easier when
you're first starting off
you know we have like scene properties
world properties
object properties all these different
properties that belong to things that in
our scene
so we're going to be diving into these
as we go the one that we want to be
focused on right now
is going to be object properties right
here
now you'll see here that we have you
know our transform values right here
which is basically our location
rotation or scale so instead of
modifying these things with all of this
over here we can modify them directly
over here
so this and this are the same
thing and now what we can do if we want
to just set the scale
manually what we can do is just set that
up right here

Watch video from 12:00 - 15:00

so we can do something like 2 and a
value
of 2. so now that when we duplicate this
right click duplicate objects
they're going to line up exactly just
like that i'm going to go ahead and
delete that
now we can do the same thing with the
one below it right so we'll select that
go to our object properties we'll do 1.5
and then 1.5 so you'll see that we have
x y z x y z x y z these are all just
coordinate systems they're 3d coordinate
systems
within this seam you'll see that up here
as well
x y z x y z so location rotation
and scale they're all going to have
their x own x y z coordinates
you can also think of them as three
dimensional coordinates so notice as
as i move this up and down right here
you'll notice that
our location is changing right here
because the
location values for each one of these
cubes are all going to be different so
then what we'll do is just go to the
bottom
we'll set this to a value of 2 and 2
and 1 and then we'll go to the one right
above it and we'll set this to
1.5 and then click that again
1.5
so we're going to start setting up our
lighting in our scene we're going to set
up some basic textures
we're going to start duplicating this
around and then we're going to start
building out the rest of the scene
but first we're going to start working
on our lighting so the first thing we
want to talk about is solid mode versus
rendered mode by default blender is in
solid mode
right up here if we click over to
rendered mode we'll see okay
now our lighting is actually doing
something if we come over here to our
light
and start moving this around we can
start to see some resemblance of a light
now it's a little hard to see because
there are no shadows there are no
shadows in our scene because basically
we don't have in a ground plane let's go
ahead and add in a grappling and we'll
do that by going to
add menu mesh plane we'll be spending a
lot of time in this ad menu up here
basically this is how we get new objects
into our scene
that are not just the default camera the
default cube the default light and we'll
be
touching up on this as we go but we'll
just do add mesh
and we'll add a plane in you see okay
it's highlighted down here
but now what we do is scale this up so
we'll go to our scale tool and we're
going to scale this
up and now we'll start to see okay now
we actually start to see that there's
some shadows going on
now this back side over here looks
really flat right here
the very first thing i do when i enter
render mode
is i come into my render settings over
here and i turn on
ambient occlusions so what is ambient
occlusion ambient occlusion
is just a fancy word for contact shadows
so you can see right here in the cavity
areas we're getting a more realistic
result and what we can do here is if we
go up on the distance say
a value of two and then a factor of two
so that's going to be spreading it out
and applying
more of that on there which now if we
toggle this on and off you'll see
is looking much much much more realistic

Watch video from 15:00 - 18:00

hdris are going to basically help us get
out of this grayscale world
and into this more colorful more
believable
type of environment so what an hdri is i
pulled up this
website hdrihaven.com and what an hdri
is is a texture or an image that we
bring
into our scene that we then use to light
our entire
environment and you can see here these
are a bunch of spheres that are rendered
with
this hdri in them so you can see we're
getting these believable reflections
this believable lighting that's all
because we're using this texture
as our environment so blender comes with
some hdri shipped already
and to start using this what we're going
to do is come up here to this little
dialog box
and we're going to turn off scene world
right here and just by doing that
it automatically enables hdris into our
scene it's a little hard to see but if
we click on this one right here
we can start going through all of them
right here and what you can do is just
start picking and choosing
and playing around with this and you can
see here that we have a bunch of
different hdris to play with
it's a little hard to see but if we do
this world opacity we
bring this all the way up to a value of
one it's basically going to allow us to
see the hdri
within our scene so i'm going to choose
the hdri that's going to be all the way
to the right which is going to be this
sunset hdri i'm going to leave the rest
of these values default values
now what we want to do is get our
physical light that we have in our
blender scene
to match our hdri light and our hdri
light is going to be a sun
so what we want to do is go down to our
light properties down here
so there's going to be another
properties menu so you have to have your
light selected
and then come all the way down here
we're going to be touching up on a lot
of these properties as we go
the most important one that we want to
touch upon is right up here so by
default
our light is set up to be a point light
which means the light itself
is emitting rays from basically 360
degrees what we want to do is switch
this over to
sun there's a couple different ones you
can feel free to play around with these
one that we're going to use right now is
just sun
now uh it's going to be way way too
bright out of the box so we're going to
do is set the strength
down to two and then our angle
down to two as well so angle basically
is going to be how
soft the shadows are if we make this the
value of like 10 for example
then you can see okay we have really
soft shadows um a value of two is going
to be totally fine for us
and then what we want to do is we want
to rotate this light to match our hdri
and you can see here
whatever the brightest side is so our
light is going to be over here
so what we want to do now is rotate this
so go to my rotate tool over here
and i'll rotate this like this get that
looking good
great and then in the next chapter we'll
start applying our minecraft textures to
our objects
so in order to take our scene from here
to here we need to get to know materials
and textures so what are materials and
textures materials are going to be
properties
of our object and they're going to be
properties that contain whether or not
it's going to look like a chrome ball
whether or not it's going to look like a
piece of glass whether or not it's going
to look like
just a flat shader whether or not it's
going to look like plastic all of that

Watch video from 18:00 - 21:00

and a texture is an image that goes into
a material so material and a texture
they're technically two different things
and that can be a little bit confusing
we take our textures from our hard drive
and assign it to
our material all of these textures are
going to be included you can find them
and download in the description
go ahead feel free to pause the video
and download those and come back
first i'm going to do is just get rid of
our ground plane we don't need that
anymore we're going to build out our
ground plane with our minecraft cubes
so right click on that delete and then
if we select our bottom cube here
we'll see that okay we have our material
properties
down here all the way at the bottom
they're going to that's going to look
like a little checkerboard shader
this already has a material in it but
some objects when you make them they
don't actually come with material
if you're using the default cube that
comes with blender you'll have a
material
but yours might look like something like
this it might just look
completely empty if yours does look
empty what you need to do
is click this new button up here and
what that's going to do is apply
a new material to this object and you'll
notice that
as i click on these you notice okay this
one has a material
this one doesn't that's because i just
got rid of that so i'll just go to hit
new
we're going to be getting to know a lot
of these properties as we go you know
specularity metallic all these things
the one that we want to get to know now
the most
is going to be base color and base color
basically allows us to change the color
of our material very very simple so we
don't actually change the color what we
need to do is apply a texture
to the base color and we do that by
using this little
yellow um dot that's next to the base
color so we click that yellow dot
and then what we do is go over to image
texture it'll be in the second column
the fifth one down and once you click
that way you'll notice that you
you now get an image texture node that
goes into
the base color slot and what that's
going to allow us to do
is now use this open button right here
that's going to allow us
to bring in a texture so i'm going to go
ahead and do that hit open you'll need
to navigate where
to wherever you downloaded your files so
i got mine right here
and then i'm going to choose white.jpg
it's going to be the
very last one i'm going to hit open and
there we go now we have our first
texture assigned to our minecraft scene
so you'll notice that the texture's
going to be blurry what we need to do
to fix that change this option right
here over to closest
now what does that do basically that's
texture interpolation
because our textures are going to be
super small they need to be stretched up
really big which is essentially
making them blurry and changing this
interpolation the closest right here
it's allowing it to be sharper that's a
little complicated we're going to move
on from there
now whenever you do this you might have
all of these textures assigned already
if your material was already pre-loaded
in here your
pillar might already be all done but if
it's not what we need to do is take this
material and assign it to
all of these other blocks right here to
do that before i do that what i'm going
to do is change the color
so before we do i'm going to just change
the name of our material
so i'm going to highlight this and
change this to white and now what we can
do
is go over to another object right here

Watch video from 21:00 - 24:00

and we'll just select this
and then we'll go to our material
assignment dialog box down here
we'll click that and then we'll choose
white
and now we've just assigned that
material to that cube
and now we just need to apply that to
the rest of them so i'm going to go
ahead and do that i'm going to select
this
go material white and again there's more
efficient ways to do these material
assignments
i'm going to do it the long way just to
keep it really really basic for part one
in part two and then as we go we'll talk
about ways
how to speed these processes up so
so now our pillar is done now we need to
create our ground so i'm gonna go ahead
and duplicate two objects
and make one brown and make one green so
i'm gonna go ahead select this
and then right click and then duplicate
object
move that down again i got my snap on
still
right click do the objects move that
down and there there we go now we have
two now
what we need is we need to change the
texture for these two at the bottom
so i'm going to select this one right
here i'm going to go over here and i'm
going to
click this little new material button
right here
and when you click this new material
button you'll notice that okay our name
changes here
that's because we just copied that
material so i'm going to select this
i'm going to hit i'm going to change it
to green
and then what i would do here is go to
my dialog box again
and my dialog box is going to be down
here so it's going to look like a little
folder right there
and then what we do is we just click
that and we just click that right there
and then we can just choose a different
texture i'm just going to go ahead and
choose
green dot jpeg
so again that one right there and then
what we do is just we just rinse and
repeat this process for the next one
so go ahead and select this one down
here i'll go ahead and duplicate the
material right here
i'll choose brown for the name
and i'll go ahead and choose my dialog
right here and then go to
brown dot jpeg there we go and we're all
set to start duplicating our cubes
around and we're going to do that next
duplicating these pillars around our
scenarios is going to be a very tedious
process so something we want to get to
know before is going to be
multi-selection
so to look at the problem here if we
simply you know do this one by one by
one
and we duplicate these around our scene
like this it is going to take
forever right so we want to get to know
multi-selection we have a couple
different ways to do multi selection the
very first one
is going to be box selection so up here
in the top
left we have our selection tool so if we
click that you notice we are on box
if it's not this little square icon
right here what you want to do
is click and hold and go to select box
right there
it should be on by default you should be
good there's other ones as well select
circle select lasso
we're going to stick with select box for
now
if we simply click and drag like this
across our scene
we can now do multi-selection so
multi-selection is how we tell blender
to do an action on multiple objects for
example
if i click and drag on this pillar right
here and then go to my move tool

Watch video from 24:00 - 27:00

we can now move all of this around at
once
so that's multi-selection for the most
part
we can apply a selection without even
using the actual selection
tool itself we can still select things
while we have our move rotate and scale
on so i'm going to be focusing on just
simply using my move tool right here
and then we can select things as well as
long as we have select box up here
activated
we can still do our click and drag
selection
the next way to do multi-selection is
going to be shift selection so
shift selection is clicking and then
while you click you hold your shift
button
and you'll see this down here right down
here you'll see my mouse
hotkeys here as i do shift select
we will select multiple objects like
this and then we can start
manipulating them after the fact just
like that and then the last way to do
multi selection that we're going to do
in this one is going to be doing
select linked so what we do here is we
click
are any of our boxes i'm going to click
the white one i'm going to go to my
selection menu up here
and we haven't been in this one at all
but there's a lot of really really good
stuff in here that we'll get to know
we're going to go down to select a link
and then do material
so select the link will be the second
one at the bottom and then material will
be the second one to the top
and we're going to do this while we have
our white
cube selected and as soon as we do that
you can see
okay boom there we have it's going to
automatically
find those cubes within our scene so we
don't have to actually do that mainly so
select
all the way at the bottom select linked
and then select material
now we have now we can go into our
profile view here
right click and then duplicate objects
and then right click duplicate objects
again so i'm going to do this
six different times for this side
and now you can see okay this is a lot
easier to work with
and again you might need to adjust
things as we go i'm going to go ahead
and continue doing this
there we go now we have our first six
pillars ready to go and there we go
we're going to finish duplicating this
out in the next chapter
so we're going to finish out duplicating
our minecraft scene
so at this point you have all the tools
that you need to be able to finish this
off
this part is going to be just more about
technique so i'd recommend just kind of
watching me as i work and then
afterwards you can
kind of pause the video and then follow
along then
the way you end up doing it might be a
little bit different and that's going to
be totally okay
so i'm going to start by just taking
these two blocks right here and then
duplicating those
over so i'm going to right click
duplicate objects
and then what i'm going to do here is
just select this pillar right there so
clicking and dragging right there and
just making sure i only select
that white pillar right there and then
what i do here is then
duplicate this over right click
duplicate objects and then do that
five different times and again the way
you might do it is going to be a little
bit different it doesn't have to be
exactly the same feel free to experiment

Watch video from 27:00 - 30:00

or feel free to match mine exactly
so we go there we have five and then
these two at the end i'm going to shift
select these
and then just right click delete
great and there we go so now what i'm
going to do here is select these ones
and before i get any further what i'm
going to do is just spread this out a
little bit i'm going to
move this light all the way over here
and i'm going to move this camera
all the way over here and that's just
going to give me some more room to work
so that when i'm selecting things
i don't accidentally select the light or
something like that and accidentally
duplicate that
so i'm going to go ahead and select this
over here i'm going to
select this like this to capture all of
those
and then right click and then duplicate
that over
right click duplicate objects and then
move that over
and again it's going to be a little
tedious lining these up
as long as you have your grid snapping
on it'll be a lot easier
there we go and then i'm going to select
these center ones right here
so just clicking and dragging on those
and then
go to my profile view again right click
duplicate this over
and again when you're doing these big
stretches usually i'm going to have to
re-line it up at the very end just to
make sure everything's
nice and tidy there we go so the pillars
are
all done and now we have to duplicate
the ground so
i'm going to duplicate this brown one
i'm going to bring it down so duplicate
objects bringing that down and do that
three different times
so it's going to be four deep and then
i'm going to do is select this
and then just start duplicating this out
so i'm going to right click duplicate
objects
right click duplicate options duplicate
objects so now this is going to be too
deep
and then i'm going to select these and
then continue down and make just
one line so right click duplicate
objects
and then continue that down
and then just make sure everything's
lined up and then just select this last
one right click duplicate objects
there we go so now what we can do is
select this like that and just make sure
we have all the right ones selected
and then we'll just go ahead and
duplicate that so if you're
more of an experienced user and you're
watching this you might be wondering why
are we not using the array modifiers
and for you new blender artists out
there the array modifier is a
faster way to do this duplication the
purpose of this
is not to be efficient the purpose is to
get practice in the viewport though
again a lot of things that we're doing
right now is not necessarily the most
efficient way
but it's the easiest way to get going
and then as we go
we'll slowly level up our skills by
adding more efficient ways to work
so i'm going to continue duplicating
this over
and then just make this too deep
there we go um so that's all looking
good and then what we can do is
uh cut some off the edges here so i'll

Watch video from 30:00 - 33:00

just select this
right click delete and i'll do a couple
of them
right click delete and i'll just kind of
break it up make it feel a little bit
more
more minecrafty
um again this is all going to be
artistic decision at this point the way
you do it
doesn't have to be the same um you can
feel free to experiment
and all of that
i'm going to wrap this up after this
last corner right here
and then in the next chapter we're going
to
have a little bonus chapter and then
we're going to tear this down with some
rigid body simulations
all right so we're going to take our
minecraft scene and tear it down with
some rigid body simulation
so to do this simulation what we're
going to need to do is get to know
active and passive rigid bodies
so what are all these things rigid
bodies this is just a fancy word
for saying simulations right and then
active
is going to be simulations that are
going to be moving
and then passive is going to be
simulations that are not moving
so a lot of fancy words but very simple
to do so the first thing that we need to
do is set up
our pillars to be active rigid bodies
so we'll select a pillar we'll go up to
select
select linked and then we'll do
material so same thing that we did
before select
select linked and then material and then
what we need to do is after we click
that is go to our rigid bodies menu
and we're going to find that up here in
object
while all these are highlighted we're
going to do object we're going to do
we're going to do rigid body down here
so object menu
rigid body and we're going to do add
active so
this menu you know we haven't talked
about this at all yet
but we will be getting into this more
and more the right click menu that we've
been accessing
gives us a lot of these properties
because whenever we right click on an
object in the viewport
it's going to give us some shortcuts to
things that are in the menus up here
in long story short we've been using
this menu with the right click
we'll do rigid body add active and then
what we need to do
is select our green down here
then we'll do select we'll do select
linked and then we'll do select by
material which will then
select all of the green objects in our
scene
then we'll do the same thing object
rigid body and then we'll do add
passive so instead of doing add active
which is going to be to move
we're going to do add passive which is
to not move
so go ahead and click that so we still
don't see any simulations right that
means we got to click this little play
button
down here and before we do that you know
if you're on a slower computer what
we're going to want to do
is switch over to solid mode um we're
currently in rendered mode and you know
this can get
heavy even just by itself but doing
animation
with this is not necessarily ideal so
i'll go ahead and click on solid mode
up here and we'll just go ahead and hit

Watch video from 33:00 - 36:00

play and again yours might be a little
bit slower because
you might be on a slower computer but
you can now see things are moving
and as we play down here by hitting this
play button
we'll see this time slider moving this
is our time slider moving through
time essentially and this is our
timeline if you work with a timeline
like a video editor
is very very similar but if you haven't
long story short
we have frame 0 over here and then we
have frame 250 over there
and that's just what we have set up
right here within our frames
so if we want to reset all we have to do
is now hit pause
and then we'll select rewind right here
so this rewind button is going to be
just to reset the simulation
now i'm going to go ahead and turn back
on rendered mode and do simulations like
that
for you you might want to stay on solid
mode so to make the simulation a little
bit more interesting what we want to do
is a little bit of
sabotaging of our minecraft scene here
so i'm going to go ahead
and come in here and start moving some
things around so something like this
where we just move this back like this
and now whenever we
move that out now this has the
opportunity to fall down
right and then all of a sudden we see
okay this thing becomes
much much more interesting in the sense
that it's going to be interacting with
each other
so i'm going to go ahead and move some
things around
we'll go ahead and move this around like
this and if we just do
like two blocks like this and maybe one
over here on the side
um that should be enough in terms of
getting something going with our scene
so it's moving a couple of the way
towards the bottom on one side
you know one go in this direction and
then we'll go in that direction and then
we'll go in this direction
it should be enough so i'm going to go
ahead and hit play
and there we go pretty fun so there's
going to be one more setting that we're
going to want to do and basically
you notice right now everything kind of
feels like it's in
slow motion um
that's because our scene scale is really
really really big and we'll
talk about scene scale as we go it's a
really important topic
but since we're working really really
big what we want to do is just
set up gravity to be to be a little bit
heavier
what we want to do here is go to our
world properties
right here and if we go to word
properties we have this little dialogue
called
gravity and if we expand that we have
our
z property right there now it's set to
negative
9.8 which is physically accurate we're
going to look at work a little bit
physically inaccurate right now and just
set it to negative
30. and now if we reset our simulation
over here
and hit play we'll see okay now it's
going to fall down much faster
and it's going to look a little more
believable it's not going to be anywhere
near physically accurate
but it's just just enough to get our
scene moving around
so if we want to save out our frame here
what we can do is just scrub with our
little blue timeline slide right here
pick a frame that we like and what we
can do is go ahead and render
this out so we can post it on social

Watch video from 36:00 - 39:00

media so i'm just going to pick a frame
right there
and then what we do is just go up to
view and then all the way at the bottom
down here we'll have view render image
so
we're going to use this render image for
now there is another way to do this
which we'll get into
specifically up here in the render menu
for now we'll just do view
viewport render image and you notice we
get this really
big image so what we want to do is set
this up to be
a little bit more social media friendly
so what we want to do here is go to our
output properties
and our output properties right here are
basically where
we set up our render resolution and our
render resolution
is going to be the size of the image
after we render it so i'm going to set
this up to be
1080 by 1350 which is going to be a
little more social media friendly
i'll just do view viewport render image
and there we go it's a little bit big
for my recording right now but what we
can do right now is just image save as
and then from there you can save it
anywhere on your computer
and then hashtag it with cg fasttrack we
love seeing everyone's work
specifically we check instagram nearly
every single day and we love seeing your
guys's renders
and now it's time to build out the sword

Your journey awaits in this new Blender Beginner tutorial series. Dive into Blender 2.9 with CG professional Robby Branham! CG Fast Track Course Library: ...

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  1. COMMON PROBLEMS – READ BELOW:

    1. Exploding cubes?
    – You may have intersecting cubes. This usually happens when accidently duplicating and not moving the cube. Try doing a single selection on each cube and move it around and see if there is a cube under it. Very tedious!

    2. Cubes not lining up when moving?
    – This usually happens when not starting with the default cube in the default location. If you move the cube in a random position, it will not line up.
    – Another solution is turning on "Absolute Grid Snapping". Found in the pulldown menu next to the snap button.

    3. All of the cubes change when you change the texture?
    – This happens when the material has not been duplicated. Rename the material to "white" and then hit the "2" button in the material pallete to duplicate, then replace the texture.

    May the force be with you.

  2. I cant change the colour of just one cube. It applies the minecraft texture to all of the cubes instead of just one. It's just the bottom one selected, but it does it anyway.

  3. Honestly, ive only been learning blender this past week or so with blenderguru, CG Fast track and ducky 3D and i am absolutely astonished at what is possible even for an absolute beginner like myself! amazing tutorials, amazing software.

    thanks man, honestly you and a couple of other channels have awoken a creative interest inside me!

  4. 35:15 It's actually scene properties, not world properties. And for beginners who're just trying to edit the numbers excluding m/s^2, you may get an error saying syntax error. Just edit the whole thing and write down the value (i.e -30) and you're good to go!

  5. Had an isiu with exploding cubes but ther vas 24 cubes at one place on evri cube. I do nat know whibut i was extra ceriful with that. Du you sugest i du it 1 more time or just continjun to video 2?

  6. So I realized at around 18:30 the object you were working on went from a gear with rounded teeth to a gear with more flat teeth but you didn't show gpu you got there. I've got to the bevel modifier twice now following along and I get the same result. Please please reply and help me because I have no idea how you're getting those results. Thank you!

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